21 November 2013

Milk- a difficult choice

Milk continues to a part of human diet right from childhood, for adults and well into old age. Yet few years ago we heard of 'artificial' milk flooding parts of India. There are reports of dairy owners giving estrogen shots and other 'special' feeds to cows and buffaloes to boost milk production. The substances find their way into the milk and from there into our bodies. It is said to be one cause of obesity in children among others.

What then are mothers to do? Is organic milk the answer?

A 2004 study by the University of Aberdeen found that organic milk contained 71% more omega-3 fatty acids than regular 'non-organic' milk. Another study by the Organic Milk Suppliers Cooperative confirmed that organic milk had 68% more fatty acids. Read more about this news here. Being organic, this milk is free of estrogen and other substances.


Yet organic products are much more expensive than inorganic produce, at times up to 70%. Organic milk is no exception.Quantities available are often limited. Yet there is an increasing trend among urban consumers to buy 'organic' milk, as described in this article. Further, some experts say claims of higher nutritional content depend on what comparisons are based on. Here is another article that discusses if organic milk is worth its higher price.

Consider what this price could do to the budget of a home maker struggling with soaring prices and a limited budget yet keen to offer the best to her loved ones. Her position as she makes a choice is not enviable.
What does she do?
What would you do?

1 comment:

Aniruddh K Deshpande said...

Hi,
Congratulations Archana madam, for opening a very important topic which most of the people just avoid even discussing leave apart finding an alternative.
When you say 'organic milk' , I think you mean 'unadulterated milk '. It is very difficult ( if not impossible) to get unadulterated milk commercially as the feed itself is not safe.
Let me answer the last 2 questions you have asked . I have given up dairy including milk , milk in tea, shrikhand, curd, pedha, and so on . If you are serious and genuinely trying to find the truth and the alternatives , you ll also give up once you know the true facts. ( By the way , I have substantiated the truth and the routine practices in the dairy industry from different sources, just not to be biased.)
I was pleasantly surprised to find a whole new world outside dairy industry. I make different nut milks, tasty curd etc at home. To know this subject in the Indian context Please visit http://sharan-india.org/.
I am sure you ll find this info interesting and useful.
Please do keep us posted of your progress.
Bye, Aniruddh K Deshpande